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Serum albumin is present at higher levels in alcoholic liver cirrhosis as compared to HCV-related cirrhosis.


Exp Ther Med. 2012 Jan;3(1):72-75


Authors: Kotoh K, Fukushima M, Horikawa Y, Yamashita S, Kohjima M, Nakamuta M, Enjoji M


Abstract

Residual hepatic functional reserve in cirrhotic patients is generally evaluated by a multivariate scoring system (Child-Pugh classification), which includes serum albumin levels as a variable. However, several patients show discrepancies between serum albumin levels and the progression of liver fibrosis, especially those with alcoholic cirrhosis. To assess whether hepatic capacity of protein synthesis varies with the etiology of cirrhosis, serum albumin and cholinesterase levels, and prothrombin time were compared between alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis. To minimize the influence of malnutrition and extrahepatic platelet destruction, patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, uncontrolled diabetes, appetite loss and/or splenal longitudinal size >15 cm were excluded. The patients with compensated liver cirrhosis were divided into three groups as follows: alcohol(+)/HCV(+) (alcohol + HCV group; n=31), alcohol(-)/HCV(+) (HCV group; n=31) and alcohol(+)/HCV(-) (alcohol group; n=27). These groups were adjusted with respect to age, gender, body mass index and platelet count. Serum albumin levels in the alcohol group were significantly higher than those in the HCV group, with a difference of approximately 0.5 g/dl in every class of platelet count. The correlation of the alcohol + HCV group was intermediate between the alcohol and HCV groups. On the other hand, the correlations between serum cholinesterase levels and platelet counts were similar among the three groups. The prothrombin time was also comparable among the groups. Accordingly, serum albumin levels were higher in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and alcohol consumption should be carefully considered when evaluating hepatic functional reserve.

PMID: 22969847 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]